Bloomsbury Inn

1707 Lyttleton Street, Camden, South Carolina 29020
Innkeeper(s): Bruce and Katherine Brown
  • Sensational in Every Season! Bloomsbury Inn

    Sensational in Every Season! Bloomsbury Inn

  • Front View of Bloomsbury Inn

    Front View of Bloomsbury Inn

  • Fall at Bloomsbury Inn

    Fall at Bloomsbury Inn

  • Enjoy the beauty of the southern veranda at Bloomsbury Inn!

    Enjoy the beauty of the southern veranda at Bloomsbury Inn!

  • Mary Chestnut Bed Chamber

    Mary Chestnut Bed Chamber

  • General's Bed Chamber

    General's Bed Chamber

  • Ladies' Parlor

    Ladies' Parlor

  • Commons Area

    Commons Area

 

Bloomsbury Quail and Grits 16 Dec 2014, 6:28 am

Quail and Grits

Quail and grits, two of South Carolina’s beloved foods, conjure up a folkloric, mythical presence right before your eyes. All across our great state, every community and ethnic group touts their favorite recipe. Each reflects cultural influences. From Native Americans to post Civil War households to the twenty-first century, quail and grits honor the best of times and the worst of times, hard times and happy times, poverty and riches, simple and gourmet — quail and grits are Southern Hospitality in a pretty serving dish.
Breakfast Grits
4.5 cups chicken stock
5 TBS butter
1 cup stone-ground grits
1.5 – 2.5 cups heavy cream
salt, white pepper to taste
fresh lemon zest, .25 of lemon
Bring stock and butter to a boil in a heavy bottomed saucepan. Slowly (it is the South) stir in the grits and return to a boil. Reduce heat, allowing grits to cook for 15 mins or until the grits is thick. Stir often to keep the grits from sticking to your favorite pan. Add slight cup of heavy cream and reduce heat, allowing grits to cook slowly for another 10 mins. As the liquid is absorbed, add more cream, cooking grits to a thick and well-done, full-bodied state. Salt, pepper to taste. Stir in lemon zest.

Sautéed Quail
20 quail breasts with skin
.5 cup butter or enough to coat quail breasts as cooked
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Preheat a large sauté pan to the high temperature. Melt the butter in the pan (don’t brown it). Season the bird with salt and pepper. Place quail breasts into pan skin side down. Leave flame on high long enough for the pan to recover its heat, then turn flame down to medium or medium high. The object is to sear the breasts quickly so they to medium, but the skin is dark golden brown. Once you’ve achieved that, flip the breasts and cook until done.

Quail and Grits Sauce
6 or 10 (to your liking) thick slices of good bacon, chopped
3 TBS flour (bread flour has the best cooked flavor)
1 medium sweet onion, finely chopped
1 medium yellow or red bell pepper, finely chopped
3 stalks celery, finely chopped
.25 cup mushrooms, finely chopped
1.5 cups chicken stock
1 TBS worcestershire sauce
.5 tsp hot sauce
1.5 cups heavy cream
butter
salt/pepper to taste
Sauté bacon, to render fat, until almost crisp. Add onion, bell pepper, celery and mushrooms. Sauté until bacon is crisp and veges are transparent. Remove bacon and veges to drain. If you have less than 2.5 TBS fat in skillet, add butter to equal 2.5. Bring fat to high heat, stir in flour. Work flour in fat to make a dark roué. Salt/pepper taste. Add chicken stock, worcestershire, hot sauce…yes, it will appear lumpy…that cooks out as the sauce thickens. Gently add heavy cream along with the bacon and veges. Return to temp and serve.

Grits is … Grits are
Grits is a “is” word…and, a dead givaway to where you were raised. In the South we say, “Ummmmmmm, emerson fine lookin’ aigs, I’ll have sum a em, sum beckon, when them there grits is dun, under sum fawl. I’ll be skippin’ da coal ciril.” (Ummmmm, those are fine looking eggs. I will have some of them and some bacon, when the grits are done, in aluminum foil to go. I will skip the cold cereal.)

Thank you for joining us Bloomsbury Inn, HAPPY COOKING, and may your plate overflow with Quail and Grits.

Famous Faces linked to Bloomsbury Inn 11 Dec 2014, 8:20 am

Compliments of Carolina Living!
Carolina Famous Faces
www.carolinaliving.com

Mary Boykin Chesnut
1823-1886

Fascinating. Riveting. Amazing.

One of the characteristics of the Carolinas which remains so appealing to many is the wealth of history – people, places and events – which occurred here as the United States was evolving. There are so many battle sites that can be visited – from both the American Revolution and the Civil War. There are plantation homes which can be found along the rivers and byways. And there are the stories which have been handed down, or in this case, written down.

I must confess that I had never read Mary Chesnut’s A Diary from Dixie, nor the expanded, annotated and thoroughly remarkable Mary Chesnut’s Civil War, which was published in 1982 and received the Pulitzer Prize for history. (Many historians consider it the finest literary work of the Confederacy.)

Here’s what one reviewer on Amazon said: “Mary was a witty and perceptive woman who was ahead of her time. She’s someone I’d like to have lunch with.” I couldn’t agree more.

Here’s a bit of her story. Mary Boykin Miller was born into a world of privilege and politics. Her father served as U.S. congressman and Senator, and was elected Governor of South Carolina. Educated first at home, then in Camden, SC schools and finally at Mme. Talvande’s French School for Young Ladies (in Charleston), in 1840, at 17, she was married to James Chesnut Jr., a man eight years older, who had already begun to make a name for himself as U.S. Senator.

As the only surviving son of one of South Carolina’s largest landowners, the pair were evenly matched in terms of aristocratic background and interest in politics. For the next 20 years, Mary spent most of her time at Mulberry, a plantation in Camden, owned by the Chesnut family. (She also spent time at Bloomsbury, another family plantation which is now an award-winning B&B which attracts guests from everywhere).

Her husband resigned from the U.S. senate when Lincoln was elected President, returning to South Carolina to help draft the ordinance of secession. He became a Brigadier General and served as aide to President Jefferson Davis.

As a political and social insider, Mrs. Chesnut was in a position to know the inner workings of the confederacy and the war. Moreover, she was intelligent, and possessed a keen sense of irony. She was witty and articulate. And she kept a diary, beginning with Lincoln’s election. The result is endlessly fascinating.

It may be hard to describe a Civil War diary as riveting, but in many ways it is. Readers discover what’s happening in the war as it happens. As readers, we know the ending of course, but each page is a revelation. One little known fact is her relationship with her slave, Molly, who became her business partner in later life. Her interaction with Molly is quite interesting.

Mary Chesnut died in 1886. The couple never had children, and Mrs. Chesnut gave her diary to her best friend, Isabella Martin. Published several times, the most recent edition is carefully researched and annotated. More than 200 of her photographs are held at the South Caroliniana Library, on the Horseshoe of the University of South Carolina.

Don’t Miss the Candlelight Tour of Homes!! 30 Nov 2014, 5:34 pm

The 38th Anniversary Candlelight Tour of Homes will take place on this Saturday, December 6th, in Camden, SC from 3:00 to 8:00 pm. It is a great opportunity to tour some of the most elegant homes of our fair city. It is a wonderful opportunity to visit our great city’s restaurants and shopping. So many things to do beyond just the tour of homes. To get a taste of what is available,visit the “Things to Do” page at BloomsburyInn

Why is the Camden Tour of Homes special? Not only are you going to see so many special homes, but your admission goes to charity. The Camden Junior Welfare League uses the money to provide scholarships and grants. It provides funding for eye and ear exams, eye glasses for children, purchases winter coats and socks to name just a few of the many great things these young women do for our community.

Of course, you can stay at Bloomsbury Inn and be right in the middle of all the action. Yes, we are on the tour this year and have started the decorating. Seven of us will be decorating for the entire week just to get Bloomsbury ready for your enjoyment.

It is going to be a fabulous tour this year seeing homes that have not been on the tour before and ones that have not been shown in several years.

It all begins at the Camden Archieve and Museum at 1314 Broad Street (where you will pick up your tour book). Tickets are $15.00/person in advance or $20.00/person at the gate. There will be a military discount on the day of the tour, military ID required. For ticket information please contact the Junior Leagueu at (803) 300-3762 or (803) 729-9224. You can also email them at tickets@camdenleague.org.

For more information please call (803) 300-3762 or (803) 729-9224. You can also email: tour@camdenleague.org

Colonial Cup this Weekend! 12 Nov 2014, 1:23 pm

If you want an exciting day at the races — come to Camden!!   Saturday, 15, November, is the Marion duPont Scott Colonial Cup.  This has often been called the Superbowl of Steeplechase.  The first race was in 1970 and it attracts fans from across the country.  What I love about this event is that it is more a family day than many other steeplechases.  While you can expect 20,000 to 25,000 attendees, it is obvious that this is a famly event with plenty of tailgating and family fun.  Included in the day are the Jack Russell terrier races, mule wagon rides, a carousel and the Paddock Shoppes in the retail village behind the Grandstand.  Rent you a parking place on the infield and stand at the fence while youwatch the horses thunder by.  In between races return to your tailgate for a libation and picinic fun.

Gates open at 0900 a.m. with the first race at 12:30 p.m.   Go to http://www.carolina-cup.org for more information.

 

Bloomsbury Baked Pumpkin French Toast 3 Nov 2014, 7:00 am

4 cups day-old bread (use whatever you have:  biscuits, croissants, muffins, load bread)

3 large eggs

2 cups milk

1/2 cup pureed pumpkin (yes, canned is perfect)

1 1/2 TBS pumpkin spice

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1 teaspoon vanilla

3/4 cup brown sugar

butter

This is the great part…mix all your ingredients the night before.  It needs to sit at least 8 hours in the frig.  In one large bowl, tear apart all of your bread.  In a second bowl, mix together eggs, milk, pumpkin,vanilla, brown sugar and spices.  Pour the wet mixture over the bread.  Mix well and be sure there is enough liquid to soak all of the bread.  (Sometimes things happen:  if not well soaked, mix one more egg with 1/2 cup milk and add to mix).  Cover, chill overnight.

I prefer to make mine in individual ramekins.  But, a 9×11 baking dish is also perfect.  Butter your dish.  When ready to cook, remove from refrigerator and preheat oven to 385 degrees. Place toast in prepared dish(s) and dot the top with butter.  Bake for 30-35 minutes.  Serve hot with hot maple syrup (the good syrup). 

             The History:

This wonderful crowd pleaser dish is so easy to make and very adaptable; it can be halved or doubled. If your family loves nuts, just add ½ cup pecan pieces to the mix or cook them in the syrup. If your family does not favor syrup, just top the toast with fresh whipping cream or powdered sugar. At Bloomsbury Inn, we try to alternate our savory and sweet breakfasts. Katherine has an uncanny ability to “feel” when food is right. She edited several time-consuming and difficult dishes to develop this baked French toast. She is continually altering recipes to offer variety. The options to this dish are as wide as your imagination (put fresh fruit in the bottom of your pan and delete pumpkin and pumpkin spice…blueberries are great). Start cooking and enjoy.

3 November 2014

October: Bloomsbury Red Velvet Cake 12 Oct 2014, 6:13 am

The first question.  Cream Cheese icing?  Chocolate icing?  The never ending battle, both icings are delicious on this perfect red velvet cake.

  Chocolate Icing on Red Velvet Cake

and Cream Cheese Icing on Red Velvet Cake

Perfect Red Velvet Cake

  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 2 1/2 cups sugar
  • 6 large eggs
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 (8-ounce) container sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 (1-ounce) bottles red food coloring (or color as you desire)
  1. Beat butter at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add sugar, beating until light and fluffy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating just until blended after each addition.
  2. Stir together flour, cocoa, and baking soda.  (Stir unless you want to be wearing flour) Add to butter mixture alternately with sour cream, beating at low speed just until blended, beginning and ending with flour mixture. Stir in vanilla; stir in red food coloring. Use batter immediately.
  3. Red Velvet Cake Batter can be baked in lots of different shapes and sizes– be sure to grease and flour your pans. With smaller muffin pans and molds, we found it easier to use a vegetable cooking spray with flour.  For a traditional cake, bake in 3 round cake pans, 8×4 inch, at 325 degrees for 25+ minutes.  Check the cake at the minimum time range, continuing to bake until a wooden pick inserted in the center comes out clean.  But, be careful not to overcook or the cake will be dry.

Cream Cheese Icing

  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1 (8-oz.) package cream cheese, softened
  • 1 (3-oz.) package cream cheese, softened
  • 1 (16-oz.) box powdered sugar
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  1. Beat all ingredients at medium speed with an electric mixer until fluffy.
  2. As you build your layer cake, place a generous layer of cream cheese between each layer.
  3. Frost the outside of the cake, swirls are pretty and so is a smooth cake.
  4. Enhance your cake by adding edible flowers or herbs or nuts.

Divine Chocolate Icing

  • 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 (16-ounce) package powdered sugar
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
  • 1/4 cup buttermilk
  1. Beat first 4 ingredients at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy.
  2. Combine powdered sugar and cocoa; gradually add to butter mixture alternately with buttermilk (watch your consistency as you may not need all or you may need a little more buttermilk), beginning and ending with powdered sugar mixture. Beat at low speed until blended after each addition.
  3. This is decadent with no enhancements, but edible flowers or nuts will work well.

Bloomsbury Red Velvet Cake

ps:  I have a nephew who loves peanut butter, I have made cream cheese peanut butter icing before for this cake and then decorated with mini reese cups…it is just plain sinful it is so good.

 

Great-Great Grandfather Brown 7 Oct 2014, 6:50 pm

Augustus Cicero (A.C.) Brown, Sr.

(12 May 1832 – 8 October 1862)

By Colonel Bruce Alan Brown, PhD, (USAF Ret )

After the Confederate defeats at Forts Henry and Donelson in February of 1862, a call went out for additional volunteers.  Governor Joseph Brown authorized the creation of a brigade-sized unit from thirty-four counties in northwest Georgia.  According to my grandmother, Clara Belle Bennette Brown, Augustus Cicero Brown, Sr.,  decided he was going to join and “show them Yankees.”

On March 4, 1862, my great, great grandfather was mustered into the 41st Georgia Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Camp McDonald in Big Shanty, Georgia.  Company K (the “Campbell Salt Springs Guards” as they called themselves) were 133 volunteers from Campbell County who were commanded by Captain Jonathan J. Bowen.  A review of the company roster reveals twenty-six separate families, represented by at least two or more relatives in the unit.  While the practice of keeping family members together contributed to unit cohesiveness, it often decimated entire families and communities.

After training at Camp McDonald, the 41st was posted to guard a railroad bridge over the Tennessee river at Bridgeport, Alabama.  Then the siege of Corinth compelled the movement of the 41st Georgia to Mississippi.  Outnumbered by Union forces, the Confederates abandoned Corinth, withdrawing 50 miles south to Tupelo, Mississippi in late May.  While encamped there, illness was taking its toll.  On July 17, 1862, Augustus’s half brother, Hiram, passed away from illness.

On July 21st, 98 of the original 133 officers and enlisted men of Company K left Tupelo to defend Chattanooga from a potential attack.  On August 29, the Army of Mississippi, commanded by General Braxton Bragg, invaded Tennessee, taking with him the 41st Georgia.  Moving on to Kentucky, the Confederate Army stopped in Perryville.  There was a drought and as the Union and Confederate Armies confronted each other, the primary issue became water.  On October 7th, fierce skirmishes broke out over the control of the only water source, Doctor’s Creek.  At night fall, the fighting closed for the day.

The next day, October 8th, a little after noon, Confederate artillery opened fire on the Union lines.  The 41st Georgia was formed on the right side of the Rebel battle line that stretched over a mile in length.  Company K was deployed near the center of the regiment which formed under the cover of a grove of oak trees that lined Doctor’s Creek and waited.  Ordered to form up, they deployed shoulder to shoulder in a linear formation with intervals of only 21 to 24 inches between them.  They were followed by a second identical line, only 32 inches behind the first.  The 98 men of Company K covered a front of approximately 25 yards and would be going into battle for the first time.

At 2:15 that afternoon, moving out from the woods, Company K came under fire from Union troops defending Open Knob Hill about two hundred yards away.  Opposing Company K were elements of the 33rd Union Brigade, the 105th Ohio and 123rd Illinois,  and an artillery battery under the command of Lt Charles Parsons.  Soon the battery opened fire on the advancing lines.  As the 41st Georgia emerged from the woods it came in view of the enemy’s battery.  The enemy opened upon them a most terrific and deadly fire.  Ten minutes into the attack, Company K encountered a wooden fence.  Confederate forces laid down on the ground firing volley after volley at the 770 men of the 123rd Illinois as they charged down the hill with bayonets fixed.  After decimating the first and second lines of the 123rd Illinois, Company K rose from the ground, crossed the fences with a Rebel yell, and moved forward shoulder to shoulder as Union cannons fired round shot and shell into their ranks.  Company K and the rest of the brigade continued to march up the hill repeatedly firing into the third line of the 123rd Illinois.

View from the fence approaching Open Knob Hill

 The action was described by Private Sam Watkins, a member of the 1st Tennessee Regiment, which was to the immediate right of the 41st Georgia:

“Two [Union] lines of battle confronted us.  We killed almost everyone in the first line, and were soon charging over the second, when right in our immediate front was their third and main line of battle.  We were soon in a hand-to-hand fight, every man for himself, using the butts of our guns and bayonets.  The guns were discharged so rapidly that it seemed the earth itself was a volcanic uproar.  The iron storm passed through our ranks, mangling and tearing men to pieces. Our men were dead and dying right in the very midst of this grand havoc of battle.  It was a life and death to death grapple.”

At approximately 3:00 p.m., the 41st charged up the hill with the 1st,6th, and 9th Tennessee reaching the crest of Open Knob Hill first and capturing the guns.  The 41st veered to the right slightly to cross the northern part of the hill.

According to Captain Thomas Malone, Assistant Adjutant-General, 3rd Brigade:

“Of course, in making this charge we lost a great number of men.  One gun pointed at the right company of the 41st Georgia was said to have killed twelve or thirteen men and desperately wounded, as I myself know, the colonel of that company and its captain, two splendid fellows.”

View looking down at the approach to Starkweather’s Hill

The 41st Georgia moved down the hill chasing the remnants of the Union 33rd Brigade until the Union line formed on a ridge commanded by Col John C. Starkweather; they formed with twelve guns.  The 41st continued to advance with the rest of the rebel line and after an initial repulse, charged again.  This time reaching the top of the ridge.  After fierce hand-to-hand fighting, they took the ridge and six of the Union guns.

The taking of Starkweather’s hill is described by Private Sam Watkins of the 1st Tennessee that was attached to the immediate right of the 41st Georgia:

“We did not recoil, but our line was fairly hurled back by the leaden hail that was poured into our very faces.  Eight color-bearers were killed at one discharge of their cannon…It was death to retreat now to either side.  Out Lieutenant Colonel Patterson halloed to charge and take their guns, and were soon in a  hand-to-hand fight—every man for himself—using the butts of our guns and …Such obstinate fighting I never had seen before or since.  The guns were discharged so rapidly that it seemed the earth itself was in a volcanic uproar.  The iron storm passed through our ranks, mangling and tearing men to pieces.  The very air seemed full of stifling smoke and fire which seemed the very pit of hell, peopled by contending demons.”

Beyond the tree line about two hundred yards the Union line formed.

The remaining elements of the Union forces retreated about 200 yards to the west on the side of another ridge not far from the Wilkerson House.  Now, the Union line stabilized.  At approximately 4:00 p.m., the Confederate line advanced and made it to within fifty yards of the Union line.  At this point the 41st Georgia and the 27th Tennessee were so decimated only a few of the remaining members of those two regiments participated.  Pulling back, the remainder of the 41st and the rest of the brigade made another assault on the ridge and again were repulsed.  Holding a line,  the brigade made a third unsuccessful assault.  The line then stabilized until the preparatory order went out at approximately 2:00 a.m. the next morning to withdraw.

During one of these assaults on the three previous positions described, Private Augustus Cicero Brown, Sr. was killed.  A “bombshell [exploded} knocking from his body his right arm and immediately afterwards he was pierced through his chest with a bayonet,” according to Private James McClarty of K Company.

Living only about an hour, a witness watched Augustus (AC) die. In which assault did he die?  We will never know, since the exact position was not identified by witnesses. I and my wife, Katherine, have walked the battlefield in the steps of the 41st in July and October of 2014 imagining the sounds of the guns and the screams of the wounded and dying.  We interviewed rangers including the park manager, Kurt Holman.  We are not sure where great-great Grandfather AC fell.

We do know some basic facts.  He was severely wounded by a cannon explosion and bayoneted through the chest and lived for approximately one hour.  In any of the three assaults, AC could have been wounded.  In only one did the line stabilize enough for the remaining members of the regiment to have time to check for wounded and be close enough to know if someone lived for an hour.  And that would have been the last assault on the ridge near the Wilkerson house.

While it was a tactical victory for the South, it was technically a defeat since General Bragg made the decision to withdraw the Army of Mississippi from the area.

Augustus Cicero Brown, Sr. was survived by his wife, Rachael, and four children:  Sarah C. Brown (b .July 1855), Mary Minerva Brown (b. August 1857), Martha P. “Mattie” Brown (b. October 1859), and Augustus Cicero Brown Jr. (b. February 1862) my great grandfather.

On December 23, 1890 the State Assembly of Georgia passed a law giving widows up to February 15, 1893 to apply for a Confederate Veterans Pension.    On January 31st 1893, Augustus Cicero Brown’s wife, Rachel Ann Marena Fults Brown, applied for that pension.  Quoted in the application is a description of my great, great grandfather’s death by his friends Privates William A. Howell, James W. Mauldin, and William S. Tucker:

Augustus Cicero Brown, Sr. was “killed by the explosion of a bomb shell at the battle of Perryville, Kentucky…his right arm was torn from his body as well as a part of his shoulder…deponents know absolutely that he died immediately afterwards…living only about one hour.  Depondent Tucker says he knows that he was also pierced with a bayonet as he fell back after the explosion of the shell.  This took place on the 8th day of October 1862.”

Confederate dead laid on the battlefield for over three days, some accounts estimate a week, before they were buried in shallow graves.  Later, Henry P. Bottoms, led the excavation and re-interment in two pits on his land.  Few were identified and it may be assumed that Augustus Cicero Brown, Sr. was put to rest in the mass grave that is now marked with the Battle of Perryville memorial seen at the beginning of this narrative.

Company K of the 41st Georgia Volunteer Infantry fought in twelve pitched battles from Perryville, Missionary Ridge, Kennesaw Mountain, Franklin and Bentonville; participated in two sieges, Vicksburg (where they were captured, paroled and then returned to the fight) and Atlanta; and served in campaigns that spanned seven separate states of the Confederacy.  Company K stacked arms and surrendered at Goldsboro, NC to General Sherman on April 26, 1865.

Of the 133 men who mustered into Company K on March 4, 1862, only 25 remained at the 1865 surrender.

References:

Battle of Perryville: Holman, K (2014, October 1). Personal interview

Foote, S. (1958). The Civil War: Fort Sumter to Perryville. New York: Random House Inc.

Georgia, Confederate Pension Applications 1879-1960. (1893, January 31). Retrieved May 23, 2012, from Ancestry.com: http:// search ancestry.com

Harmon, J. (1997, October 28). Brown-L Archives. Retrieved May 23, 2012, from Rootsweb: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/BROWN/1997-10

Harmon, J. (2000, March 19). Brown-L Archives. Retrieved May 23, 2012, from Rootsweb: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/BROWN/2000-03

Holman, K. (May 31, 2014).  Battle of Perryville: Movement Maps. Unpublished manuscript.

Kelley, M. (n.d.). 41st Georgia Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from Rootsweb.ancestry.com: http:www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gacampbe/Company_K-History.htm

Kennedy, F. H. (Ed.). (1990). The Civil War Battlefield Guide. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Leonard, C. B. (2011, September 5). The Battle of Perryville. Retrieved June 11, 2012, from www.carolynbleonard.com: http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard/DutchCousines/Entries/2011/9/5

Muster Roll of Company K, 41st Georgia Volunteer Regiment. (n.d.). Retrieved May 21, 2012, from www.generalbartonandstovall: http:/www.generalbartonand stovall.com/html/company_k.html

Sanders, Stuart W. (2014).  Maney’s Confederate Brigade at the Battle of Perryville. Charleston, S.C.: The HIstory Press

The Armies at the Battle of Perryville. (n.d.). Retrieved May 24, 2012, from History of War: http://historyofwar.org/articles/armies_perryville.html

The Battle of Perryville. (n.d.). Retrieved May 24, 2012, from Wikipedia: http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Perryvile

The Baxter Family from Georgia. (n.d.). Retrieved May 28, 2012, from Ancestry.com: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/24036662/family/familygroup?fpid=1462572717

The War of the Rebellion: A compilation of the official records. (n.d.). Retrieved May 25, 2012, from Cornell.edu: http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/

Watkins, S. R. (1900). Co. Aytch (2nd ed. ed.). Chattanooga: Times Printing Co.

Quaker Cemetery: Joseph Brevard 22 Sep 2014, 12:08 pm

There are so many things to see and do in Camden while staying at Bloomsbury Inn.  In Quaker cemetery, we continue to highlight some interesting sites.
Joseph Brevard has been described as  unostentatious, industrious, and upright.  Born July 19, 1766, Joseph entered the revolutionary service in 1782 at the age of sixteen. He was commissioned a Lieutenant in the North Carolina line, filling this position until the end of the war. His brother Alexander described him as delicate and small of statue, and felt sorry for him when it came time to mount the guard.
Joseph became a secretary to General Arnold who was in command of Philadelphia. It seems that young Joseph had a fine hand at writing. Joseph Brevard had seven brothers, besides himself, who fought in the Revolutionary War. His family performed distinctively and patriotically. At the end of the war, Joseph settled in Camden, South Carolina. In 1789, he was elected by the Legislature to the position of Sheriff of Camden District. He was only twenty-three and served well in this arduous post in those unsettled times. In 1792, he was admitted to the bar, and on March 17, 1793, he married Rebecca Kershaw.
A successful lawyer, he began in 1793 the compilation of the law reports which bore his name and continued to do so until 1815.  In 1796, he as elected to the state legislature and served two terms until 1800.   He was elected a Judge in 1801. The follwing year,  his wife Rebecca passed away. Judge Brevard continued on the bench until 1815 until ill-health caused him to resign. In the next few years his health improved, and in 1818 he won election to Congress and served one term. In 1821, at the age of fifty-five, Judge Brevard passed away at Camden. Judge O’Neall made the following statement concerning Congressman Brevard: “In every situation and office of life he did his duty. What more can or ought to be said, unless it be to say that he feared God and kept his commandments, which is declared in the inspired volume to be “whole duty of man.’”
Joseph Brevard had four children:  Dr. Alfred Brevard, Edward Brevard, Eugene Brevard, and Sarah Aurora Brevard Elmore.History-rich is an understatement concerning Camden, South Carolina. As you visit, you will quickly learn from Dr. Bruce Brown of Bloomsbury that you must visit often and visit soon if you want to learn more.

Allopathic Garden 11 Sep 2014, 12:50 pm

While visiting Washington, Arkansas with our grandchildren, we discovered a historic home of an allopathic doctor. In his back yard was an interesting garden.  I asked what you would find and of course many of the items were herbs that we have today.  I was told cilantro, lemon balm, pepperment, rosemary, thyme, lavender and german chamomile were common.   Here at Bloomsbury, Katherine keeps a herb garden to use with our guest’s breakfast.

Some of the more exotic home remedies that caught my attention (I don’t recommend any of them):

Snake bite: Apply the mouth of a bottle filled with spirits and camphor to the wound.

Sore throat:  Eat loaf sugar with camphor or 20 drops of turpentine on sugar before going to be.  Katherine will tell you her grandmother was still using this home remedy on her as a child.

Stings:  Apply wet salt or a raw onion.

Scarlet fever: Rub the body all over with bacon fat and citrate of ammonia.

Corns:  Bind half of a raw cranberry, with the cup side of the fruit toaward the foot.

Teeth and Breath:  Honey mixed with pure pulverized charcoal to make a tooth paste.  Lime water with a little Peruvian bark (what is that?) to be occasionally used for offensive breath.

Toothache:  A poultice made of ginger or of common chickweed applied frequently to the cheek.

Warts:  Wet the top of the wart and rub two or three times a day with a piece of unsalted lime.

Well, I guess if you were out in the woods with only yourself, these would be possible options.  But, I do not recommend their use today or even tomorrow.

The grandkids were a little freaked out.  Especially when I told them that if they come to Bloomsbury with a sore throat they may get sugar with turpentine.  Just kidding!!

 

 

 

 

 

Grandmother’s Yeast Rolls 5 Sep 2014, 7:56 am

Bloomsbury Inn Yeast Rolls

by Sally Rose Stites Chisam

1 cup milk, scalded

1/4 cup sugar

1 tsp salt

1/4 cup butter

1/2 cup warm water (pretty warm 105-115)

2 pkgs yeast

2 eggs

5 1/4 cups flour

Scald the milk (that makes it a “Grandmother” recipe) and do not let simmer or boil; stir in the sugar, salt and butter;  cool to lukewarm. Place very warm water into a very large warm bowl.  Sprinkle in the yeast and stir until dissolved.  Add lukewarm liquid mixture, eggs and 2 cups of flour.  Beat until smooth. (yes, by hand)  Stir in enough remaining flour to make a soft dough.  Turn dough out on lightly floured board; knead until smooth and elastic, about 8 – 10 mins.  (you won’t need extra upper arm exercise today).  Place the dough in a lightly greased large bowl, turn it over so top of dough is greased.  Cover and let it rise, near but not on the cook stove or close to the fireplace.  Cover with soft cloth and it will double in about 30 minutes.

Punch down the dough.  Turn it out on a floured board. Divide dough into 3 pieces.  Form each piece into nine inch long roll, pinch into 9 equal pieces, form each piece into a ball and place in a greased round cake pan.  Make 3 pans like this.  Cover, let rise in warm place until doubled again.  Brush with butter, bake 375 degrees for 15-20 minutes.

(I don’t know about you, but I don’t always need that many buns.  I usually make a dozen in a greased pie pan.  Then I place all the other balls on a cookie sheet, before they rise the second time, and allow them to freeze as individual dough balls.  After they freeze, place them in a freezer bag to store.  When I need them, I take them out and place them in a greased dish to rise.  Remember they are frozen so it will take some time (2-3 hours) to defrost and rise again.  I promise these are worth every minute of time and inch of effort to make these!)