The Fulton House Bed & Breakfast

7006 SW Virginia Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97219
Innkeeper(s): Wendy L. Fencsak, Owner; Kevin Waring-Manager

ROMEO & JULIET: Oregon Ballet Theatre in Portland February 27 – March 4, 2016 4 Feb 2016, 8:31 am

Portland Ballet

Romeo & Juliet in February

February 27 – March 5, 2016 | Keller Auditorium
James Canfield | Sergei Prokofiev

Featuring the OBT Orchestra for all performances

A love that recognizes no boundaries, and an impossible-to-forget emotional journey intensified by what may be the most sublime music ever written for ballet… Get ready to be consumed by the passion of Romeo & Juliet as Oregon Ballet Theatre proudly returns James Canfield’s signature work to the repertory following an absence of more than 15 years!

As per Wikipedia, “Romeo and Juliet belongs to a tradition of tragic romances stretching back to antiquity. The plot is based on an Italian tale translated into verse as The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet by Arthur Brooke in 1562, and retold in prose in Palace of Pleasure by William Painter in 1567. Shakespeare borrowed heavily from both, but expanded the plot by developing a number of supporting characters, particularly Mercutio and Paris. Believed to have been written between 1591 and 1595, the play was first published in a quarto version in 1597. The text of the first quarto version was of poor quality, however, and later editions corrected the text to conform more closely with Shakespeare’s original.

Shakespeare’s use of his poetic dramatic structure (especially effects such as switching between comedy and tragedy to heighten tension, his expansion of minor characters, and his use of sub-plots to embellish the story) has been praised as an early sign of his dramatic skill. The play ascribes different poetic forms to different characters, sometimes changing the form as the character develops. Romeo, for example, grows more adept at the sonnet over the course of the play.”

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Willamette Valley Wine and Jazz………March 12 & 13 1 Feb 2016, 4:20 pm

Willamette Valley Wine and Jazz!

Willamette Valley Wine & Jazz is a festival in historic Silverton, Oregon.

The event features premier jazz music from the Pacific Northwest and fine wines from the Cascade Foothills wineries. The Main Event takes place at The Oregon Garden, an 80-acre botanical garden, followed by wine tasting and live jazz in downtown Silverton.

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PORTLAND JAZZ FESTIVAL 26 Jan 2016, 8:14 pm

FEB 18-28, 2016

Click on the link to get the line up and ticket info for PDXjazz 2016!

Schedule and ticket info

Fulton House Bed and Breakfast is convenient to all venues.

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Stay free in January! 11 Jan 2016, 4:59 pm

Book a two night stay in January and get the third night FREE!

Request rate code “January” when making reservation.

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Octoberfest! 1 Sep 2015, 6:36 pm

Request promotional code OCTOBERFEST and join us during October and November to celebrate the craft beer capital of the U.S., PORTLAND!

Stay with us for 2 week nights either month and we will send you to The Fulton Pub with a card for a flight of beer to sample and enjoy.

Fulton Pub has had a long history in the John’s Landing neighborhood and is a perfect starting point for your journey!

Fulton Pub Brew Menu 

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Tilikum Crossing Grand Opening 29 Aug 2015, 6:07 pm

It’s a historic day with a party to match!

On September 12, 2015, we’re coming together as communities, neighbors, families and riders to celebrate the opening of the MAX Orange Line.

We’ll have fun events and activities happening along the new line, and rides on MAX, TriMet buses, Portland Streetcar and the Aerial Tram will be free all day.

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Where “Jazz is soulful” 2 Jun 2015, 9:17 am

Best Jazz in Portland

Check out Jimmy Mak’s  where “Jazz is…soulful, fresh, in the pocket, innovative, blue, swings, bad, solid funky, alive, tight, improvisations, cool, intimate.

“One of the world’s top 100 places to hear jazz.” by Downbeat Magazine.

Best Jazz in Portland

Check out the above website for upcoming events.

 

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SAVE THE SOUND–PROTECTING & PRESERVING PUGT SOUND SINCE 1984 13 Apr 2015, 9:34 pm

The Fulton House Bed & Breakfast recently donated a two night Stay & Wine Basket at a Fundraiser for the PUGET SOUNDKEEPER ALLIANCE in Seattle, Washington at the AVEDA’S EARTH MONTH 2015 FIFTH ANNUAL EVENT “SAVE THE SOUND”  AUCTION, MUSIC, FOOD AND DRINKS.

2 night Stay at the Fulton House Bed & Breakfast (valued at over $500)

History of the Puget Sound Alliance:

Founded in 1984 as the Puget Sound Alliance (PSA), PSA was the first grassroots citizens’ organization to focus exclusively on protecting the marine environment of Puget Sound. Initially, PSA fought successfully for secondary wastewater treatment at West Point in Seattle and a Puget Sound Management Plan. In 1990, following the successful model of the Hudson Riverkeeper in New York, PSA launched the 6th licensed Waterkeeper program in the nation when it hired its first Puget Soundkeeper and began patrolling the waters of the Sound by boat.
Renamed Puget Soundkeeper Alliance (Soundkeeper) in 1992, the organization was a founding member of the international Waterkeeper Alliance, a national movement founded by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Today, Waterkeeper Alliance and its member organizations are the fastest growing environmental movement in the world with over 200 licensed Waterkeepers on six continents.
Mission:

Soundkeeper’s mission is to protect and preserve the waters of Puget Sound by monitoring, cleaning up and preventing pollutants from entering its waters.
To accomplish its mission, Soundkeeper actively monitors Puget Sound through kayak patrols and uses the Soundkeeper patrol boat on a weekly basis enlisting a network of trained volunteers to detect and report pollution. As a major environmental stakeholder, Soundkeeper actively engages government agencies and businesses working to regulate pollution discharges from sewage treatment plants, industrial facilities, construction sites, municipalities and others. Soundkeeper actively enforces the Clean Water Act of 1972, using the power granted to citizens to sue under provisions of the Act, to stop polluters in their tracks and bring egregious polluters into compliance with the law. As one of the nation’s leading citizen advocates, Soundkeeper has a 100% success record and has filed over 150 cases. Soundkeeper’s settlements typically result in accelerated compliance measures including new implementation of, or upgrades to, stormwater and wastewater treatment systems. A 1993 settlement with the City of Bremerton is directly attributable to the Dyes Inlet shellfish beds reopening for the first time in 40 years. To date, Soundkeeper’s enforcement team has awarded over $3.6 million to third party restoration, education and water quality mitigation projects to heal the damage in the affected watershed and provide an incentive for future compliance. Soundkeeper does not receive any settlement money from Clean Water Act cases. Although we achieve our mission by stopping pollution, we know that much of Puget Sound’s problems can be stopped at the source by engaging the people and businesses in our community – after all, Puget Sound is where we all work, live and play.
We’re working to protect the waters of Puget Sound now and for future generations.kayak_patrol_hdr

Why? Because Puget Sound is in trouble.

• industrial SoundDeclining fish populations and die-offs in Hood Canal
• PCB’s in marine mammals
• health warnings about Puget Sound salmon and shellfish
• beaches closed to shellfish harvest
• Superfund cleanups
…and the list goes on.
Here’s what we’re doing about it

Legal Action: We enforce the Clean Water Act through legal action.
Patrolling and Monitoring: Puget Soundkeeper Alliance actively patrols and monitors the waters of Puget Sound.
Active Engagement: We pursue the Clean Water Act’s goals through active engagement with business, government agencies and citizens.
Governmental Involvement and Business Partnerships: We get involved at many levels of government and legislation to toughen pollution standards. We create partnerships with business to help reduce pollution.
Here’s what you can do

Do your part to stop pollution: drive less (bike, walk, bus, carpool), fix vehicle oil leaks, rely on natural yard care rather than chemicals, report pollution when you see it happen, wash your car on your lawn or at a commercial car wash, and the list goes on…
Become informed about pollution.
Discover the beauty and richness of Puget Sound.
Join our team as a volunteer.
Give what you can to help protect Puget Sound now and for the future.

% of the proceeds benefit Local Clean Water Effort.

 

Check out the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance

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Rain or Shine, Portland Offers Plenty of Opportunities to Get Wet! 18 Jun 2014, 1:53 pm

 

Oregon Coast by Michael Tillotson

Summer time in Portland really can’t be beat.  For a few short months the infamous rain showers (usually) take a vacation, letting the sun shine hot and bright and opening up a whole new set of opportunities for Portlanders to get wet! This city is surrounded in every direction by beautiful water features — endlessly flowing rivers and waterfalls, serene lakes and even the ocean are all easily accessible to the city and they are just waiting to be enjoyed. While the shopping, dining and drinking in Portland shouldn’t be overlooked, make sure you set aside some time in your visit to enjoy some of the natural places that make the Pacific Northwest such a wonderful place to be!

 With the official start of summer just days away, here are a few ideas of water-focused excursions that are sure to cool you off on a hot summer day in and around the Rose City.

Ocean

Ecola State Park photo by Carrie Lipps

The drive to the Pacific Ocean is only one and a half hours from Portland, making a day on the beach an easy trip from the Fulton House.   Cannon Beach is a popular tourist destination where you can find easily accessible beaches and lots of shops and restaurants. Haystack rock is Cannon Beach’s iconic monolith, (giant rock) that harbors tide pools teeming with sea life. This is a popular spot so if crowds aren’t your cup of tea, you might opt to head either north or south to a few other less crowded beach destinations.

Ecola State Park lies just north of Cannon Beach off highway 101. The views of the coast from this park are breathtaking and always changing so a trip up here never gets old. There are several trails to take within the park that lead to secluded beaches and scenic viewpoints. The beaches are ideal for walking, with compacted sand, tons of rocks, shells, driftwood, tide pools, sea creatures and sea birds to discover –You may even spot a bald eagle or even a whales from one of the lookouts. Although the water stays pretty cold year round, many people find its briskness refreshing on a hot summer day! There are several picnic areas with barbecues, as well as restrooms available for day use. And if you feel like you just can’t go all the way to the coast without seeing the landmark Haystack Rock, you’re in luck! Because the view of Haystack and “the needles” from Ecola State really Park can’t be beat.

Just 10 miles south of Cannon Beach on highway 101 lies a hidden gem of a beach: Oswald West State Park. A short hike through lush rainforest leads you to half-moon shaped Short Sands Beach- a secluded spot where locals come to surf, windsurf, boogie board and swim in the ocean (most people choose to don wetsuits, it’s cold!) Oswald West State Park encompasses 2,474 acres with majestic views of Cape Falcon, Neahkahnie Mountain, Arch Cape and Smuggler’s Cove, so you can choose to head straight for the beach or pick a trail, each provides breathtaking coastal views.

 Lakes

Lost Lake by Mike Prine

If you’re up for a bit of an adventure and you don’t mind the drive, point the car towards Mt. Hood and head up to Lost Lake. Sitting 3,100 feet up on the slopes of Mt. Hood, Lost Lake is an ideal introduction to the Oregon outdoors. There’s an easy loop hike that takes you through ancient forests and wetlands and lots of places to dip your feet in to the 175 feet of icy blue (average water temperatures in the summer are around 65 degrees). Rowboats and canoes can be rented at the lodge and there are several excellent swimming spots along the lakeshore. The view of Mt. Hood’s northwest face is perhaps the crowning glory of this spot. You don’t want to miss it.

If you’re looking for a place to catch some fish, head out the Columbia Gorge to Benson Lake. The lake is stocked with trout, largemouth bass, crappie, sunfish and bullhead and has good bank access.  There is no boat ramp but fishers are encouraged to float in tubes and rafts. Take I-84 E to exit 30 just before Multnomah Falls but be sure you read the Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations before you go.

Rivers

Floaters on the Clackamas River, Oregon Live

FLOATING! A favorite summertime activity in Portland is to float down one of the regions many rivers. Think amusement park “Lazy River” rather than class 5 rapids. The Sandy and Clackamas rivers are ideal for summer floats, the former perhaps a little warmer than the latter. There really isn’t much that’s better than gliding merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily, gently down the stream with a cold drink and your closest friends and loved ones beside you. You can dunk in the water if you get too hot, and there are several spots along each route to stop and swim or rest on the shore if you so desire. To float the Clackamas River you will need to bring your own innertubes (which can be bought several stores in Portland. We recommend individual tubes or the double ones with an inflatable cooler in the middle), snacks and beverages and your group will need two vehicles. Drive to Carver Park and leave one vehicle in the parking lot, then take your crew and all  your gear to Barton Park and launch your rafts from there. You’ll end up floating about five miles, which usually takes about 3-4 hours with a few short stops. There are a few sections of gentle rapids, nothing scary or dangerous- just fun! A word of warning though, this section of the river is pretty popular so be prepared to join the crowd of merry floaters!

No need to venture far from the Fulton House B&B if you’re itching to get out on the water- the beautiful Willamette River is just a couple blocks from our door! You can rent kayaks or the newly popular stand up paddle boards (SUP) from Portland Kayak Company which is a short 4 block walk from the B&B, then roll your vessel another block to Willamette Park’s boat launch. From here you can paddle south towards Sellwood and check out the funky houseboats on the east side of the river or you can head north and take a loop around Ross Island. The island is uninhabited and is owned by Ross Island Sand and Gravel, which mined the area extensively from 1926-2001. You can paddle right up to the processing plant which sits on the shores of Ross Island Lagoon on the island’s east side. An occasional barge comes through, but action at the plant is pretty minimal these days. As you round the northern tip of the island, you get a pretty stellar view of Portland’s skyline and the bridges that connect the east and west sides. Boats are rented by the hour or the day at very reasonable prices and the Fulton Pub is only a block away once you get back from your trip!

For a “two rivers for the price of one” experience (actually, it’s free!) head up through North Portland to Kelley Point Park where the Willamette empties into the Columbia River. While it’s not quite as picturesque as some of the other river spots I’ve highlighted in this post, Kelly Point Park is a charming spot for an afternoon stroll or a picnic. You can choose to wander wooded trails or follow the paved paths. There’s a sandy beach by the river where you can take a dip or just walk, a big rolling lawn for picnics, games or napping, and blackberry bushes galore! Time it right and bring a few bags or Tupperware containers and you could be dining on the most delicious fresh berries you’ve ever tasted. The best part of this park is it’s so close to the city center so you don’t have to spend hours in your car to get there!

Waterfalls

Ponytail Falls by porbital

Multnomah Falls is a ubiquitous tourist landmark and it’s a sight to see for sure. Multnomah Falls is Oregon’s tallest waterfall and if you’re going to make a trip into the gorge you really have to stop and visit. You can simply view the falls from the bottom or you can hike the 2.6 miles (roundtrip) to the top and back. If you’re quick you can do it in a bout 90 minutes. It’s a lovely hike with several side trails you can take to other equally stunning waterfalls, but be prepared for crowds.

A little further east from Multnomah Falls off the Historic Columbia River Highway is another great spot for a waterfall tour. Start by following the Horsetail Falls Trail, pass through a chamber behind Ponytail Falls, and then continue on Oneonta Gorge Trail to see Oneonta Gorge, Oneonta Falls and Triple Falls. You won’t get to swim here but you can enjoy the refreshing mists and the shade that the gorge provides. This is also a popular area, so be prepared to share the trail with others.

Kayaking on the Willamette travelportland.com

If you’re lucky enough to miss out on that one kind of water Portland is (in)famous for (you know, the kind that comes from the sky), make sure you check out some of the other fabulous water features this amazing region provides. Be safe and have fun, the opportunities abound!

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