BBOnline Member SINCE 2003

Wildberry Lodge

135 Potato Branch Road, Leicester, North Carolina 28748
Innkeeper(s): Glenda and Ken Cahill

Holiday shopping in Asheville 29 Nov 2016, 6:23 am

 

Getting into the spirit of gift giving is seamless when shopping in Asheville. We are a wonderland for the present seekers and bringer of good tidings. To help you have the best experience our mountain town has to offer I have highlighted 4 of the best shopping destinations in Asheville. Whether you made it onto the naughty or nice list, we have something for everyone.

Grove Arcade

The historic Grove Arcade is a magical place to spend your time doing holiday shopping. The beautiful building is decked out with lights, poinsettias, and snowy Christmas trees shining brightly on winding wrought iron staircases draped in garland.

Winter Wonderland festivities kick start on November 18th and last through January 4th. They open with quite the bang too. Deck the Halls Lighting Celebration is from 5-8 and the Asheville Symphony Chorus is there to carol for you beginning at 6 pm. They make this a fun venture out a great option for families too with ornament decorating for kids, story time, pictures with ole Santa Clause and free servings of cookies and warm cider.

Located right outside and wrapping around the arcade is the bustling Portico Market, offering more eclectic gifts and locally crafted goods.

Santa visits are held every Sunday from 1-5 until Christmas.

 

Biltmore Village

This charming little area is definitely for the architectural aficionados! The Biltmore Village is said to have been built to capture the look and feel of a rural England village or French hamlet. The streets are lined with maples, ginkgo and poplar trees as you stroll along brick sidewalks.

From traditional to peculiar, this area is bound to please the tastes of just about everyone with it’s over 40 shops to visit. The cottages have been turned into store fronts and studios that host house ware products, naturalist goods, furniture, books, clothing for men, women and children of all ages as well as galleries for jewelry and art admirers. The streets are also lined with tasty restaurants and bakeries such as the Well-Bred Café which I highly recommend.

 

Downtown Asheville

Extolling the abundantly quirky virtues of downtown Asheville never get old. What I love about shopping in the heart of Asheville is that it feels like an experience; an experience that you can fine tune to your liking in such an exciting variety of ways. Your downtown experience not only includes the Grove Arcade but also over 200 locally-owned and operated shops, boutiques and antique emporiums.

Buskers and entertainers on the street corners are ready to serenade you or humor you with their talent. On every street you’ll find a variety of restaurants that appeal to a variety of tastes buds such as French, Greek, Middle Eastern, Thai, German, Spanish and so much more! When you get tired from walking head into one of our many pubs and maybe even catch a jam session to enjoy. Maybe you’ll even get to see our famed bicycling nun that rides around Asheville.

 

Asheville Outlets

Asheville Outlets opened up in 2015 and was designed to be an open-air village for shopping and hosts 70+ of our nation’s top retailers. It is beautifully designed with plenty of sunlight, waterfall fixtures and awnings for rainy weather; all providing more of a relaxed shopping experience. The food court is located indoors for when you get a bit hungry but there are also options right outside of the mall. After you are done shopping you can even head right down the street to an entrance to the Blue Ridge Parkway for a scenic drive and hike.

 

Written by Kate Randall

 

Three cheers for Asheville beer! 22 Nov 2016, 6:02 am

This ones for the beer enthusiasts.

 

I remember the good ole days when PBR and Bud Weiser were perfectly fine choices for beer. I was young, so young, and knew nothing about the glorious world of craft brews. I have come a long way from the Coors Light slinging 21 year old I used to be. I credit this transition entirely to Asheville, who single handedly opened up my eyes and my ever so grateful taste buds to the true craftsmanship that goes into brewing our fermented friends.

Our beers flow and pour about as continuously as our mountain springs do. Asheville has a near endless reel of winning Beer City USA since 2009 and the whole country has taken notice. When we throw pubs like the Thirsty Monk into the mix, the world beings to take notice too.

So what makes Asheville such a leader in brew land? Why do people come from all over to experience “beercations” here? How does our little mountain town stand up next to such big cities like Portland, Oregon for recognition?

At first, I thought it was mostly about our community. Asheville is a tight nit group of folks. We love to support our farmers and small scale growers, our talented DIY friends that make soft and colourful scarves and create nourishing home-made lotions to pamper ourselves with, our small businesses, musicians, herbalists and definitely our brewers.

I think our grassroots movement and dedication in supporting our friends and friends of friends is at the core of our flourishing beer scene. Now besides the obvious fact that we take brewing very seriously here in Asheville and strive to brew excellence at all times, a really great point was made that “ashevillians” are the new guys on the scene.

We are the excited kids with huge dreams and endless possibilities just pouring into our craft. We are not doing the same old thing. Tradition is here and will always have its place but our beers have been elevated by ramped up and creative minds wanting to birth something different. Beers that stand tall and stand out.

I’ve had beer with rosemary, beer crafted with jalapenos (yes, it was delightfully spicy), dandelion beer and beer brewed with the kick of smoked chipotle chili peppers. I loved them all. Especially the Rosemary infused beer!

With the arrival of winter chilling our bones one of the most sure ways to add heat to your hearth is to cozy up to a nice beer. With this in mind I’ll be taking you to some of the best spots in Asheville this winter that have some of the greatest; and in some cases most renowned beers around. Stay tuned.

A look into the Appalachian wildfires 18 Nov 2016, 6:14 am

The wildfires currently raging across the southern Appalachia have much of the public unnerved and worried for our forests and national parks. I am certainly one of those people as the facts are quite disheartening.

This crisis is extremely difficult to manage due to the drought-like conditions afflicting the southern states. Thus far, we have six states burning and North Carolina is the hardest hit out of all of them. With over 130,000 acres burning, 50,000 of those acres are from WNC. To put the enormity of the collective fires into perspective, 130,000 acres is 9 times the size of Manhattan. For the sports enthusiasts, it is the equivalent to 97,000 footballs fields. Don’t worry about picking your jaw up off the ground; mines still there too.

Big thanks go out to the 5,000+ fire fighters that have shown up to battle these wildfires, working around the clock in extremely dangerous conditions. Another big thanks go out to all the health care providers giving aid to the 200+ peoples that have been hospitalized due to breathing difficulties.

Air quality issues have been set for the Charlotte area with a code red designation as their air quality is comparable to Beijing, China (never a good thing).  On average we breathe in 100 particles per breath on a good day and the Charlotte area is currently breathing in 1000 particles per breath. For frame of reference, Beijing, China’s daily measurements are steady at 1500.

 

When confronted with depressing news, I search fiercely for the silver lining. I know, I know. How can something positive come out of 130,000 acres of beautiful forest land burning? As it turns out, forest fires can be quite healthy, hence why some of you may be familiar with the term “controlled burns” that occur in various national forests and protected lands.

Granted, these fires are not in control but I am choosing to look at the positive outcomes from this misfortune. For instance, the fire clears out dead and decaying plant matter as well as invasive weeds that may be choking out other species. Thinning out the green density allows for more sunlight and rain water to reach the plants which creates a favorable opportunity for new seedlings to sprout and flourish. The burning of the forest also creates ash. Ash restores nutrients to the soil thereby enriching the earth and making it much more fertile for future growth.

There there, did my silver lining make you feel better? No? Honestly, it didn’t make me feel any better either, but hey, at least I tried.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I am off to perform a rain dance!

 

Written by Kate Randall

 

Blue Ridge Babushka 15 Nov 2016, 5:17 am

 

 

The Blue Ridge Mountains are home to some of the richest temperate deciduous forests in the world. We credit this honor in large part to the last Ice Age. During the last Ice Age, thousands and thousands of plants and animal species moved to the Southern mountain viewAppalachians because ice did not cover our mountains the way they did in the Northern Appalachians. They faced a near certain extinction without this refuge.

After the Ice Age, some species traveled back north but many species stayed, giving us the high biodiversity we see still thriving today.

I have a nickname for our portion of the Appalachians. I call her the Blue Ridge Babushka. Why? Well, because she is old. The Appalachians are the oldest mountain range in the world. Of course this is contested by some people but the vast majority of scientific consensus states that we are in fact the most ancient mountains in existence today. They formed during the collision of the plates in the Ordovician Period about 480 million years ago. Impressive, eh?

Scientists also found crystalline rocks in our region that were dated up to 1.1 billion years old! The pressure and heat necessary to create crystalline rocks would have annihilated any and all primitive life forms in the area at that time. The time period I am referring to is called the Precambrian Age. The Blue Ridge Babushka, indeed.

A bit of fun trivia is that we are one of only two temperate rain forests in America. Yes, you read that right. Rainforest. The extra rain creates an exciting variety of flora and blankets our woodlands in purifying soft mosses. A forest rich in mosses, lichens and ferns are an outstanding indication of goclub moss and mushroomod air quality as they quite literally filter and purify our air. So if you find yourself amidst our greenery, breathe deeply, it’s good for you.

The Appalachian temperate rainforest includes the Nantahala National Forest, Cherokee National Forest and the Great Smokey Mountains National Park. So the next time you find yourself in one of our great national parks, take a moment to appreciate the fact that you are standing in a rainforest.

Both temperate and tropical rainforests are crucial to our earth’s climate. They literally stabilize it by helping to regulate the earth’s temperature and weather patterns. They are precious. Unfortunately, 55% of our rainforests have been destroyed due to deforestation which is 100% human driven. Farming, logging, mining, building of dams and plantations are all huge contributing factors.

I moved here to Leicester for many reasons but most importantly it is because these mountains feel like home to me. They are also the literal home the hundreds of thousands of species just like in every other habitat that is threatened around the world.

storm on a mountain

 

What can we do?

  • We can support companies that operate in a way that minimizes damage to the environment.
  • Establish parks to protect our forests and rainforests.
  • Purchase foods grown in a sustainable way. (Vote with your dollars)
  • Teach others about the importance of our forests.
  • Reach out to your state legislators and let them know how you feel.
  • Learn about conservation issues within your own community and start there.
  • Volunteer at conservation projects, join a conservation organization.

 

For more information you can follow the links provided below which will give you wonderful ideas on how to lower your impact on this world we all share.

http://www.savetherainforest.org/

http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/

https://www.coolearth.org/

 

 

 

 

 

Written by Kate Randall

 

 

 

Pine 8 Nov 2016, 8:03 am

Pine medicine

 

One of my most cherished ingredients for harvest inspired recipes is pine infused honey.  That aromatic sweet coupled with a spiciness that is to me, quite invigorating, takes me away to a place of organoleptic bliss. I could walk around as a pine scented mammal every day and be very happy and content.

I mentioned how I enjoy drizzling it over my pumpkin bread in one of my last blogs and some of you were interested in how to make it. I thought it would be fun to share with you some other uses of the pine tree as well as teaching you how to make the pine infused honey.

Pine infused honey definitely comes in handy for cold and flu season as it is an expectorant, which means it helps to expel mucous from your lungs. Although pine it is not one of the more popular herbs for this, it works nonetheless and the honey itself is also a gentle expectorant. Perfect medicine for kids and adults alike, and it tastes sooooo good! Oh the things you learn on this blog! I like to keep it interesting, if you hadn’t noticed.

Pine has an affinity for upper respiratory lung infections as it is highly antibacterial and as a lovely bonus it is a pretty darn good source of vitamin C. Vitamin C is water soluble, so I recommend making a nice tea out of it to slurp up those benefits. Food is medicine, right?

This tree is so very versatile and I personally use it in a variety of ways. Culinary, medicinal, therapeutic, cleaning and decor. If you are wondering how one goes about infusing pine needles into honey, you are in luck because it is super easy. The wonderful thing about pine is that they can all be used interchangeably, so fear not if you do not know the exact species of a particular pine tree.

Some pines are sweeter, some have more of a kick, and others may have too much pitch which gives it a turpentine taste, like you just swallowed floor cleaner. If you do stumble upon that kind of pine, harvest those needles and infuse them in some vinegar and your floors shall be squeaky clean in no time! So feel free to experiment with this magnificent evergreen.

 

 

Pine needle honey

-Pick a pine, any pine, and collect the fresh aromatic needles.

-Garb them. Garbing is a simple technique that involves clearing the plant material of any debris. See any bird poop? Wash the needles. Is there browning? Remove it. Any bugs? Set them free, or eat them, whatever floats your boat.

-Get a glass jar and pack in the needles but not too tightly to allow room for the honey.

-Pour in raw honey and stir really well making sure there are no pockets, then pour more honey in to top it off. Cap it.

-Let this infuse for three to six weeks and wallah!

-To strain you must embrace the fact that it is sometimes a sticky & messy process, but that’s half the fun! Place the jar in a sauce pot with a little warmed water and allow the honey to thin out a bit, then you can strain into another container.

I enjoy this over toast, in my decadent baklava recipe, in my teas or just by the spoonful because it tastes so good.

 

Written by Kate Randall

 

One of my most cherished ingredients for harvest inspired recipes is pine infused honey.  That aromatic sweet coupled with a spiciness that is to me, quite invigorating, takes me away to a place of organoleptic bliss. I could walk around as a pine scented mammal every day and be very happy and content.

I mentioned how I enjoy drizzling it over my pumpkin bread in one of my last blogs and some of you were interested in how to make it. I thought it would be fun to share with you some other uses of the pine tree as well as teaching you how to make the pine infused honey.

Pine infused honey definitely comes in handy for cold and flu season as it is an expectorant, which means it helps to expel mucous from your lungs. Although pine it is not one of the more popular herbs for this, it works nonetheless and the honey itself is also a gentle expectorant. Perfect medicine for kids and adults alike, and it tastes sooooo good! Oh the things you learn on this blog! I like to keep it interesting, if you hadn’t noticed.

Pine has an affinity for upper respiratory lung infections as it is highly antibacterial and as a lovely bonus it is a pretty darn good source of vitamin C. Vitamin C is water soluble, so I recommend making a nice tea out of it to slurp up those benefits. Food is medicine, right?

This tree is so very versatile and I personally use it in a variety of ways. Culinary, medicinal, therapeutic, cleaning and decor. If you are wondering how one goes about infusing pine needles into honey, you are in luck because it is super easy. The wonderful thing about pine is that they can all be used interchangeably, so fear not if you do not know the exact species of a particular pine tree.

Some pines are sweeter, some have more of a kick, and others may have too much pitch which gives it a turpentine taste, like you just swallowed floor cleaner. If you do stumble upon that kind of pine, harvest those needles and infuse them in some vinegar and your floors shall be squeaky clean in no time! So feel free to experiment with this magnificent evergreen.

 

 

Pine needle honey

-Pick a pine, any pine, and collect the fresh aromatic needles.

-Garb them. Garbing is a simple technique that involves clearing the plant material of any debris. See any bird poop? Wash the needles. Is there browning? Remove it. Any bugs? Set them free, or eat them, whatever floats your boat.

-Get a glass jar and pack in the needles but not too tightly to allow room for the honey.

-Pour in raw honey and stir really well making sure there are no pockets, then pour more honey in to top it off. Cap it.

-Let this infuse for three to six weeks and wallah!

-To strain you must embrace the fact that it is sometimes a sticky & messy process, but that’s half the fun! Place the jar in a sauce pot with a little warmed water and allow the honey to thin out a bit, then you can strain into another container.

I enjoy this over toast, in my decadent baklava recipe, in my teas or just by the spoonful because it tastes so good.

 

Written by Kate Randall

 

Tis the season to eat pumpkins 2 Nov 2016, 9:28 am

Tis the season to eat pumpkins, falalalala lalalalaaahhhhh.

 

The month of October may be a perfect time to carve some pumpkins but November is definitely the month for eating them! We’re simply replacing the carving kit with spoons and forks and it’s just as much fun!

Did you know that pumpkins are actually a powerhouse of nutrition? They are high in antioxidants and the B-complex vitamins such as riboflavin, folate and niacin as well having decent amounts of important minerals like copper, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus and iron. Not only is this beautiful orange fruit filling but it’s also insanely low in calories too with only 30 calories in one cup of pumpkin!

It’s a shame that so many people only think to use this delicious and versatile fruit for pumpkin pie only around thanksgiving time. You can incorporate it in desserts, stews, preserves, soups, casseroles, salads and even make butters.

The two recipes I am providing today are not only scrumptious but also relatively low in sugar. We don’t need any extra help gorging ourselves on cakes and cookies this season do we? These recipes are sweet and satisfying but I never feel that pang of guilt afterward. You know, that “OMG I just ate half a carrot cake!?!?!?! WHAT HAVE I DONE????”  Let’s avoid that, shall we?

Foods should make us feel good, not bad. And for those of you wondering what’s so bad about devouring half a cake to yourself?  I say to you, nothing! Nothing at all. That cake had it coming.

 

PUMPKIN PECAN MACAROONS

I love these little suckers. They are moist and packed with flavor and for those of you who stay away from gluten these happen to be gluten free! It’s a win-win for everyone! As long as you like pumpkin. And coconut. If not, then it’s totally not a win for you.

pumpkin macaroon

I like to take these on car rides because I don’t go anywhere without snacks on hand. They also accompany my picnics fairly often.

2 egg whites

1 ½ C shredded coconut

1/3 C sugar

1/3 C pumpkin puree

¼ C chopped pecans

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 tsp pumpkin pie spice

Pinch of salt

Beat egg whites together then add in the rest of ingredients one by one, mix thoroughly. Place rounded circles of mixture onto parchment paper on a baking sheet. I like to use a tablespoon to get a more uniformed look and it also provides a flat bottom. You can glob them on with a spoon too for a more rustic look. Bake at 350 F for about 15 minutes or until golden brown.

 

 

 

HOT SPICED VANILLA PUMPKIN DRINK

hot spiced pumpkin drink

This drink was my alternative to a hot chocolate. It is super simple and perfect for people that do not drink caffeine. I cozy up to this delicious and smooth drink for sipping all throughout the fall and winter time! A magical pumpkin potion, indeed!

2 C milk

1 C pumpkin puree (or more if you want a thicker consistency)

1 1/2 tbsp brown sugar

2 tsp vanilla extract

1 ½ tsp pumpkin spice

 

Add milk into saucepan with pumpkin puree and mix until warmed. Then add in sugar, vanilla and pumpkin spice. Heat to just before a simmer then take it off. I like to put whipped cream on top of mine sometimes too or you can even add marshmallows.

Happy Halloween from your friends at the Wildberry 25 Oct 2016, 6:53 am

 

 

Eat, drink and be scary! Well, we definitely have the eating and drinking mastered but we will be taking a rain check on the scary this year. Instead, we are replacing it with fun! Trick-or-treaters do not venture this far up the mountain but we make sure to keep the spirit of Halloween alive and well here at the Wildberry. Don’t be alarmed if you see witches running around doing the inn chores. They already had the brooms so all that was missing was some pointy hats and warts!

 

girl posing next to witch

Your Halloween morning breakfast is made extra special. You will start with a menacing medley of eye of newt, wing of bat and toe of honey badger with a frog bile glaze (prepared in our finest cauldron). Our main course is tongue of troll, spider eggs and a side of toadstools. For desert we go all out with the rare spirit of unicorn topped with belladonna dew. This 5 star three course meal is certain to start your day out with the perfect amount of energy….and a little bit of fright for good measure.

 

One of the best parts of Halloween here is definitely the fire pit. The weather is perfect. It’s that time of the year when summer has finally laid down her head for rest and winter is just awakening from his slumber. Not too hot and not too cold. You can take a stroll through the woods on a beautiful trail up to the fire pit. The footpath is illuminated at dusk by solar lights so don’t worry about not being able to see at night. We have a two tier deck with comfortable chairs and lounges with tables. Cooler buckets are also there for chilling or holding any refreshments you may want to bring with. We prepare the fire for you (unless it is something you want to do on your own, of course) and provide the goods for roasting marshmallows and sometimes smore makings too. It’s the perfect nook to cozy up and be romantic with a loved one or to hang out with some new friends for drinking and laughing. Good times all around!

 black and white witch

 

What is Halloween without treats? We have little chocolate snacks and candies for you placed all over the lodge. The most amazing hot cider EVER is available all day and night for you in the dining area as well. If you are in the mood for some more hocus pocus, we have a spooktacular selection of scary movies available for watching in the loft upstairs.

 

Written by Kate Randall

Day trip to Graveyard Fields 18 Oct 2016, 6:00 am

Graveyard Fields

Every Autumn I take my family on a trip to Graveyard Fields. It’s been a tradition for us for 7 years running now and we are mesmerized by its beauty just as much today as we were our first trip.fall colours

Traditions can offer us the most welcoming of sensory remembrance. Our first visit was on a cool and rainy autumn day. It was cloudy outside and incredibly foggy yet it only seemed to enhance the alluring beauty that surrounded us. The crimson reds and blazing oranges all seemed to burst with even more colour than usual. The scents of fir and rainwater hugged us as we followed the muddy unmarked trails. There was even this one smell that neither of us could identify. It was potent and pungent and we weren’t sure how we felt about it at first as it was a particularly odd smell but every year we go we now look forward to it. And it’s always there, gifting us with that sensory remembrance.

There are two theories as to how Graveyard fields got its name. One is that a great windstorm laid out hundreds of spruce and fir trees on the slopes. Over time the tree stumps were overgrown with mosses and lichens resembling an eerie graveyard. The other theory stems from the exuberant amount of logging that occurred in these parts, particularly for the chestnut trees, which left behind many tree stumps that also became covered with mosses and lichens and looked like a grave site.

bridge

In 1925 and in the 1940’s the same area that endured the logging and windstorm suffered catastrophic fires that laid waste to the locale. The fire raised the temperature of the soil to such a high extreme that it rendered the soil sterile. Nearly 100 years later the plants still have a difficult time thriving. Even though the recovery has been slow we are seeing an increase in shrubs and bushes in the fields which give us hope that the soil is finally starting to heal.

There are three main waterfalls at this hike, Upper Falls, Second Falls and Yellowstone Falls. A picturesque stream called the Yellowstone Prong creates these waterfalls which is pretty impressive once you see how spectacular they are. All powered by a little stream filled with brook trout.

Due to the high precipitation, disturbances, high elevation and peaty soil the area has an unusual mix of forest, shrub and wetland vegetation. Wildflowers that bloom include a variety of asters, honeysuckle, galax and bluets. Ground pine and the endangered club moss cover the grounds. Flowering dogwood, fraser fir, oaks and yellow birch are all home here as well as the rowan tree which is a very special tree to me as it is the name of my wonderful son.
blueberriesUpon strolling through the woods you’ll come across mountain bogs, boulders and little swimming holes with water as clear as gin. Get ready for berry hunting too! Graveyard Fields is known for their wild blueberries but gooseberries and blackberries are also ripe for the picking. The best time to pick is toward the end of August, but given how hot our summers have been in recent years I recommend heading out a bit earlier.

Graveyard Fields hike is located off the southern section of the Blue Ridge Parkway at milepost 418.8.

 

Written by Kate Randall

 

Pumpkin bread recipe! 11 Oct 2016, 8:04 am

 

 

The Northern winds are sweeping in with gusto as autumn nears. My heart goes pitter-patter gazing upon the brilliant crimson reds, blazing oranges and burnt sienna brown of the falling leaves swirling around, getting that last whimsical dance in before winter’s arrival. This time of year holds such a precious place in my heart, not simply for its ridiculous beauty but more for the stirring it creates inside of me, most notably of culinary creativity.

pumpkin bread with sunflower

My kitchen-witch nook is most definitely cramped this time of year with all sorts of delicious infused honeys, elderberry elixir, fire cider, breads and pies and whatever tinctures may be macerating at that time. As you may have learned throughout this blog, I am an herbalist so geeking out on plants and folk remedies is kind of my thing.

Baking goes into full throttle in my homestead too and of course my go-to ingredient is the pumpkin.  It is said that my pumpkin bread is the best in all the lands….well, at least to my son and husband. Yes, of course I will share my recipe with you. This bread is moist and jam packed with the fall flavors of cinnamon, clove and orange zest and the perfect mid-day snack to accompany a hot cup of tea. This pumpkin bread is amazing by itself but also fares well with plum jam. My favourtie way to have my pumpkin bread is with a pine needle infused honey drizzled on top. Don’t knock it till you try it because it’s delicious!

pumpkin bread in sunlight

Glenda and Bonnie are also known for their pumpkin recipes. You will be well taken care of every Sunday morning when they treat you to their pumpkin spiced pancakes. They are wonderfully delicious and a big hit with everyone at the lodge. They are made from October all the way through November so get in and chow down while you can!

 

Pumpkin Bread recipe

 

  • 3 ½ C all-purpose flour
  • 4 small eggs or 3 large eggs
  • 2 C brown sugar
  • 2 C canned pumpkin pie mix
  • 1 C coconut oil
  • 2/3 C coconut milk
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp ground clove
  • Zest of one orange

 

Directions.

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.

Add flour, baking soda, salt and cloves into a bowl, mix well and set aside.

Melt the coconut oil and set aside.

Whisk eggs then mix in (one at a time) sugar, pumpkin, coconut milk and then the oil. Add the orange zest.

Mix the wet into the dry.

slice of pumpkin bread

 

I used a 10 x 6 loaf pan that is 3 inches deep but any baking pan will do. It just depends on how thick you want the bread to be when it is done. I set the timer on this for an hour but it had to go longer because of how thick I wanted the bread to be. An extra 30 minutes and it was done. Just remember that a different pan will result in a different time so just keep an eye on it. I’ve never gone wrong with this recipe! I think it is the coconut milk that makes the bread so moist. Enjoy! And please do let us know how it turned out for you!

 

 

Written by Kate Randall

Get your grub on 4 Oct 2016, 6:16 am

The more classy and high end restaurants of Asheville get plenty of attention but our little local guys deserve lots of love too. Here are 5 places that I frequent while in town whether I am on a budget or not.

 

12 Bones

Pork. Pork. Pork. Cheap lip smacking pork. 12 Bones is a local favourite. You can tell by the ridiculously long line of people outside everyday waiting to get their oink on. Don’t be intimidated by the line though as the food is turned very quickly so you can get your grub on lightning fast.

12 Bones has two locations. The first location is located in the River Arts District which gained worldwide attention when President Obama stopped in to get his BBQ fill.             The address is at 5 Riverside Dr. The second location is in Arden (South Asheville) at 3578 Sweeten Creek rd. Open daily Monday through Friday from 11 Am to 4 Pm.

 

Bandidos Latin Ktichen

I think this restaurant has been flying under the radar for a while now. The food is incredible. They elevate tacos and quesadillas to something fresh and new such as the smoked trout taco (my favourite) and the duck confit quesadilla. They make interesting appetizers like the fried pork belly and serve local brews. They are located at 697 Haywood rd. Ste E. Open Tuesday-Saturday from 12-9.

 

HomeGrown

HomeGrown is where I go when I am in need of comfort food. Their food philosophy is making slow cooked wholesome food with a huge emphasis on sustainability and using local farms. The menu is really diverse too. Examples include the lamb & lentil stew, catfish po’boy, buttermilk fried chicken with mushroom gravy, BBQ tempeh and redneck pot pie.

The menu changes due to local availability. They are located at 371 Merrimon Ave and are open 7 days a week from 8 to 9.

 

Asheville Pizza and Brewing Company

This funky joint is well worth a visit. Not only do they make amazing brews in house but they also have $3 movies every day at 1pm, 4pm, 7pm and 10pm. You can eat your food in the theater as well. My favourite is the spinach burger and just about every pizza they make is downright delicious.

Located at 675 Merrimon Ave and open 7 days a week from 11AM to 12PM.

Lorettas Café

Best. Sandwiches. Ever. Seriously. Every time I go now I get the Big Bad Wolf which is loaded with smoked pulled pork, ham, bacon, pimento cheese, coleslaw, Cajun mayo and creole mustard. Need I say more? Everything they make is mouthwatering perfection.

Located in downtown Asheville at 114 N. Lexington Ave. Open Monday – Saturday from 10AM to 5PM.

 

Now go get your grub on!

 

Written and taste tested by Kate Randall