Boston Restaurants: Oldest and Best

Dating back to the early 19th century, Boston restaurants have a rich culinary tradition, and it's still going strong. When you think of things to do in Boston, your first thoughts may involve a Red Sox game or a trip into historic downtown, but in between, you can fill your stomach at some of the oldest restaurants in the United States. BBonline presents a guide to some of Boston's oldest and best restaurants, so that when you get home you'll be able to boast about more than that great hot dog you had at the game.

The Union Oyster House
41 Union St.
Boston, MA
(617) 227-2750
www.unionoysterhouse.com

The oldest restaurant in Boston, and with a claim to being the oldest restaurant in the United States, The Union Oyster House has been around since 1826, and even more distinctive, is still in the same location. Much of the building the Union Oyster House is in is still original, giving it a distinctively Revolutionary War feel. Offering a wide variety of seafood, from Boston fish chowder to clams, scallops or of course, oysters, this is still a great place to dine. Head out from your Boston bed and breakfast for a great dining experience at this historic restaurant.

The Parker House
60 School St.
Boston, MA
(617) 725-1600
www.omnihotels.com

Also dating back to the 19th century, the Parker House was built on the notion, unusual for the time, that sometimes you want to eat at other times than just breakfast, lunch or dinner. While it's no longer in its historic location, the Parker house is still offering hearty fare and has recently been repaired and renovated, making it a great stop at any time of day. It's famous for the Parker House rolls and Boston Creme Pie.

Jacob Wirth Restaurant
331 Stuart St.
Boston, MA
(617) 338-8586
www.jacobwirth.com

Built in 1868, this German restaurant is the second oldest restaurant in the city and resides in the theater district of Boston, making it a great place to get dinner if you're on your way to a show. The bar offers a great selection of imported and domestic beers, and the restaurant offers a wide variety of excellent German and European food. By the time you've finished eating and carousing at this Boston watering hole, you'll be ready for a taxi to take you back to your Boston Inn.

Durgin-Park
1 Faneuil Hall Sq.
Boston, MA
(617) 227-2038
www.arkrestaurants.com

A great Boston landmark, Durgin-Park resides by the waterfront in the Quincy Market Area. Starting out as a place to feed the crews of ships killing time in Boston harbour, Durgin-Park has evolved into a restaurant for everyone, and is one of Boston's most well known places to eat. Durgin-Park retains the long tables from that period, and believes in hefty portions of food at all times. Options at Durgin-Park are hearty American food, including chicken pot pie, ribs and roast beef.